Tag Archives: politics

Happy Holidays! Multiculturalism Show

In which the Nerds take seriously the PMs claim that Australia is the “most successful multicultural society on earth” and discuss multiculturalism, its origins, politics and policy with a diverse (get it) group of guests.  The Nerds also talk about a new book on animal welfare policy in Australia

Hosts:

  • Dr Amanda Elliot, Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Sydney
  • Dr Stewart Jackson, Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney

Guests:

  • Doctor Sev Ozdowski, Director, Equity and Diversity, Western Sydney; Chair of Australian Multicultural Council.
  • Associate Professor Christine Inglis, Honorary Associate Professor, China Studies Centre, University of Sydney
  • Dr Leticia Anderson, National Centre for Cultural Competence, University of Sydney
  • Dr Peter John Chen, Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney

With show extras! Including a book give away. Ho ho ho.


Podcast Special: Interview with Aaron Martin

A full length interview with Dr Aaron Martin, University of Melbourne , recorded at the 2016 Australian Political Studies Association conference at UNSW Australia.

The subject of the interview was his paper, titled “Understanding political trust: evidence from survey experiments”, written with Nick Faulkner (Monash), Raymond Orr (University of Melbourne) and Kyle Peyton (Yale University).

The abstract for the paper is:

    For decades social scientists have debated the connection between the quality of political institutions and political and social trust, a debate ignited in large part by Putnam¹s (1995a; 1995b) influential work on social capital. In this article, we present experimental evidence of a causal link between the perceptions citizens have of government officials¹ behavior, and the trust they have in government (political trust) and others in society (social trust ¬ a widely used proxy for social capital). The results suggest the behaviour of government officials plays a distinct role in shaping attitudes towards peers and the formation of social capital.

Podcast Special: Interview with Hannah Murphy-Gregory

A full length interview with Dr Hannah Murphy-Gregory from the University of Tasmania, recorded at the 2016 Australian Political Studies Association conference at UNSW Australia.

The subject of the interview was her paper, titled Governance via persuasion: ENGOs, social license and Australian environmental policymaking”

The abstract for the paper is:


    Environmental non-governmental organisations (ENGOs) in Australia are seemingly more politically active and influential than ever before. They have been at the forefront of recent high-profile debates on issues of national significance including the Great Barrier Reef, the renewable energy sector, factory fishing trawlers, forest conservation and of course climate change. Yet important questions about ENGOs remain: what new strategies and tactics have ENGOs used to increase their visibility and influence on Australian policymaking in recent years? How should we understand their contributions to contemporary governance arrangements? This paper addresses these important questions by critically analysing the increasingly used ENGO tactic of withdrawing or denying a ‘social license to operate’ (SLO) to various corporate actors via three recent campaigns. These include the campaigns against Gunns Limited’s proposed Tamar Valley pulp mill, Seafish Tasmania’s FV Margiris/Abel Tasman factory fishing vessel, and salmon producer Tassal’s bid to farm salmon on Tasmania’s East coast. I argue that SLO is best understood as ‘governance via persuasion’, a mode of governance first proposed by Bell and Hindmoor (2009) to capture political activity akin to ‘governance without government’ that incorporates appeals to normative values. Whilst the success of ENGO campaigners appears to support the society-centred view of governance, I contend instead that ENGOs’ SLO campaigns many ultimately enhance state-led hierarchy and therefore support a state-centric relational account of governance. This is because ENGOs in fact demand (and succeed) in bringing about greater government regulation as a result of publicising concerns about corporate actors. Employing the SLO strategy may promote opportunities for ENGOs to participate in subsequent network governance processes alongside state and corporate actors.

2016 APSA Conference Special

In which the Nerds take a break and rely on that old standard of sitcoms the world over, a clip show.  But in a special “election nerds” twist, provide clips from upcoming “podcast only” special interviews from the 2016 Australian Political Studies Association Conference, held at the University of NSW (Australia).

Hosts:

  • Dr Stewart Jackson, Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney
  • Dr Amanda Elliot, Department of Sociology, University of Sydney

Interviewees:

  • Joanna Vince, University of Tasmania
  • Rachel Eberhard, Queensland University of Technology
  • Lyndal Hasselman, IGPA, University of Canberra
  • Hannah Murphy-Gregory, University of Tasmania
  • Nicholas Munn, University of Waikato
  • Aaron Martin, University of Melbourne
  • Ben Spies-Butcher, Macquarie University
  • Shaun Ratcliff, Monash University
  • Heath Whiley, University of Tasmania
  • Farah Naz , University of Sydney
  • Katharine Gelber, University of Queensland
  • Kcasey McLoughlin, University of Newcastle
  • Meagan Tyler, RMIT University

Environmental Big Picture Show

In which the Nerds talk to environmental experts about the current state of the “big picture” aspects of environmental policy: climate change. They consider how far we’ve come in recent international negotiation rounds, what we can really expect from these agreements, and issues of democratic participation and justice in the debates.  In the second half of the show, Dr Anna Boucher joins the panel to talk about her new book on migration policy and gender.

Please note: due to a technical problem, this is a low-quality recording.

Hosts

  • Dr Stewart Jackson, Department of Government, University of Sydney
  • Dr Amanda Elliot, Department of Sociology, University of Sydney

Guests

  • Professor David Schlosberg, Government and IR, Sydney
  • Dr Ian McGregor, Management, UTS
  • Dr Anna Boucher, author of Gender, Migration and the Global Race For Talent (Manchester University Press, 2016), Department of Government, University of Sydney

Social Policy Show

In which the nerds dig deep into one of the largest areas of the budget and an under-considered topic in the 2016 federal election: social policy.  What’s been going on, what are the tenancies of policy makers, and what are the future directions of this key area of the policy process.  We discuss employment, welfare services, inequality, participation, and the future of the welfare state in a globalised context.

Hosts:

  • Dr Amanda Elliot, Department of Sociology, University of Sydney
  • Dr Stewart Jackson, Department of Government, University of Sydney

Guests:

  • Associate Professor Susan Goodwin, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney
  • Associate Professor Gaby Ramia, Department of Government, University of Sydney

With additional post show chatter/ cynicism!

2016 Weekly Wrap-Up Show number 4

In which the nerds review week 5 of the 2016 Australian Federal Election.  With Guests:

  • Professor Rodney Smith, University of Sydney
  • Professor Ariadne Vromen, University of Sydney

The Nerds discuss the federal nature of the debate, drivers behind localism and if the 2016 campaign is more local than previous years.  They also consider issues of political use of public funding, youth participation and policy issues concerning young people.

In the podcast extra, the Nerds consider and reject concerns about political violence in Australia, and discuss the issue of economic participation of younger people.

2016 Weekly Wrap-Up Show number 2

In which the nerds review week 5 of the 2016 Australian Federal Election. With Guests:

  • Professor Anne Twomey, University of Sydney Law School
  • Dr Lloyd Cox, Macquarie University

The nerds discuss election themes, concerns about violations of the electoral act, challenges to the Senate voting system reforms, and the means by which half-term Senators will be selected following the poll.

The post-show podcast extra content spends time talking about the comparative absence of minor parties, their wins and challenges in the campaign.

The Budget Wrap-up Show

In which the nerds revisit the 2016 federal budget, examining aspects of the budget that were overlooked in the initial reporting, linking the budget with longer-term policy making and trends, identify gaps and structural defects in this most political of policy documents.

Hosts Dr Stewart Jackson and Dr Amanda Elliot are joined by:

  • Dr David Bond, Lecturer in Accounting from the UTS, and
  • Dr Elizabeth Hill, Lecturer in Political Economy from the University of Sydney

2016 Eurovision Special

In which regular host, Dr Amanda Elliot is joined by guest hosts Associate Professor Anika Gauja and Daniel Skold to discuss the ins, outs, ups and downs of the 2016 Eurovision contest.

In the second annual Eurovision special, the hosts are joined by:

  • Dr Jess Carniel, School of Arts and Communication, University of Southern Queensland.
  • Professor Alison Lewis, School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne
  • Dr Lukasz Swiatek, Department of Media & Communications, University of Sydney

And discuss the Eurovision audience in Australia and abroad, Eurovision’s push into Asia, what Eurovision tells us about European politics and society, controversies, and the research of newly minted Dr Swiatek’s research on the production side of major events of this kind.